wordpress blog stats
Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

RBI has zero info on payment ecosystem readiness for new card storage rules, RTI reveals

In response to an RTI request, RBI said that is has no information pertaining to a number of important questions around its new card storage rules.

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has no idea if the payment ecosystem is ready for its new card storage rules, which prohibit merchants and payment gateways/aggregators from storing the card details of customers. In response to a Right to Information (RTI) request filed by The Quantum Hub (TQH), the central bank on June 17 said that it has no information available on how many tokens have been provisioned by card networks like Visa and Mastercard, how long do token-based transactions take to complete on average, what the expected transactions per second rates are when using tokens, how many payment aggregators/payment gateways have provided final Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for integration to merchants, whether testing was conducted using tokens, whether testing has been done for special use-cases like refunds, chargebacks, EMIs and recurring mandates, whether testing has been done for the guest checkout use case, etc.

Why does this matter? RBI’s card storage rules were set to go into effect at the start of next month, but the regulator last week extended the deadline by three months to the end of September. Regardless of the extension, it’s concerning to know that the central bank was/is pushing for such stringent regulation without knowing how ready ecosystem players are and how businesses and customers might be affected.

ReadDeep Dive: Why Online Debit And Credit Card Transactions Will Start Failing From July 1


Never miss out on important developments in tech policy, whether in India or across the world. Sign up for our morning newsletter, with a “Free Read of the Day”, to experience MediaNama in a whole new way.


Questions around token provisioning

While merchants and payment aggregators are not allowed to store customers’ debit or credit card numbers, RBI in September 2021 issued guidelines to allow them to store token numbers. Tokens will be unique numbers based on a combination of card details, merchant, and device. For example, your Visa HDFC card will have token A on Flipkart and the same card will have token B on Amazon, the same card will have token C on PVR. Tokenised transactions involve two steps:

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
  1. Token provisioning: The first step is to generate a token for a particular card. Tokens are generated by the card network (Visa, Mastercard, Rupay, American Express).
  2. Processing transactions using tokens: Once the card is tokenised, the merchant can use this token to carry out the transaction without the customer having to enter their card details every time.

The RTI request posed the following questions around token provisioning:

1. What is the latest status on token provisioning by card networks (Mastercard, VISA, Rupay) and issuing banks (ICICI, SBI, etc), specifically:

  • Number of credit and debit cards in circulation by Card Network/ Issuer
  • Percentage of credit and debit cards by Card Network/ Issuer on which at least one token has been generated
  • The average number of tokens generated per card in circulation by the Card Network/Issuer

RBI response: The information in the manner desired is not available with the Reserve Bank of India (RBI).

2. Can a user generate a token in real-time and have a payment processed on the said token simultaneously?

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the Right to Information Act, 2005 (RTI Act).

3. With regard to the previous question (question 2), has any testing been done by any of the ecosystem players in this regard? If yes, could you share the data created from such testing, especially success and failure rates?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

4. Does the RBI have any estimate about how much time, on average, it takes for the two to happen simultaneously, i.e. how long does the customer need to remain in session to generate a token and have a payment successfully processed/ completed on it?

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

Questions around token processing

5. What are the typical transaction per second rates expected of card networks from 1st July i.e., how many credit and debit card transactions are processed for online transactions per second on a typical day in the Indian economy?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

6. Have ecosystem players submitted any data with respect to testing on token processing? If yes, could you share the data created from such testing?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

7. Based on the above submissions or otherwise, and with regard to question 5, what is RBI’s estimate of the current capacity of the payments ecosystem to handle tokenized transactions i.e. does the RBI have an estimate of the maximum number of tokenised transactions the ecosystem can handle at present per second? Please provide data separately, if available, for transactions per second rates concerning both tokens generated in a previous session, as well as tokens created in the same session.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

Questions around special use cases

“If your card was used fraudulently, you should be able to request a chargeback. If there is a high ticket payment item and you want to convert it into an EMI, you should be able to do it. If you want to get a refund from somewhere, you should be able to get that refund. So these are the three issues that need to be solved in order for the tokenisation solution to work completely for a customer, but tested solutions for these don’t exist,” an industry source explained to MediaNama

8. Does the RBI have information on testing for specific use cases? In particular, has any information been submitted by ecosystem players on successfully testing for the following:

  • Initiating a refund or chargeback on a tokenized transaction
  • Transaction processed on a token be converted into an EMI
  • Transaction processed on a token have offers and discounts applied to it
  • Setting up of recurring payments/ e-mandates for new customers
  • Setting up of recurring payments/ e-mandates for existing customers

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

9. If so, what have been the results of such tests for use cases outlined in question 8? If not, does RBI plan to conduct such tests in the future?

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

10. Is RBI planning to undertake a pilot project or create a regulatory sandbox to test the success of tokenization in a controlled environment, before the solution is extended to the entire payments ecosystem?

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Questions around guest checkouts

If not for tokenisation, the other alternative for online card transactions is guest checkout, where customers enter card details every time. But the issue here is that RBI’s guidelines allow only the card issuers and the card networks to store card data, and the acquiring bank cannot store the same. The way systems are built today, the acquiring bank will need the payer’s card information for the transactions to go through. In light of this, the RTI request posed the following questions to RBI:

11. Does the RBI have an estimate of the percentage of overall online debit and credit card transactions that are guest-checkouts (wherein the customer opts not to save their card – in token form or otherwise – with the merchant)?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

12. With regard to the above (question 11), has there been any testing done for the guest checkout use case?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

13. In the context of guest checkouts, how will refunds be handled if the acquirer bank is not allowed to save customer card details?

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

Other relevant questions

14. Does the RBI have information on how many Payment Aggregators/Payment Gateways have provided final APIs for integration to merchants?

RBI response: No such information is available with RBI.

15. Following the enforcement of the circular on ‘Restriction on storage of actual card data [i.e. Card-on-File (CoF)]’ dated 23/12/2021, will acquirer banks be allowed to store customer card data?

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

16. Has the RBI done any studies on the effect of the above-mentioned provisions on the supply of credit to Indian consumers and small businesses, given that cardholders may be forced to move from credit card-based payments to other types of non-credit payments?

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.

17. Does the RBI recognize any solutions, other than tokenization, to overcome the issue of merchants not being allowed to hold customer card data? 

RBI response: Query is in the nature of seeking an opinion and is not information as defined in Section 2 (f) of the RTI Act.


This post is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Please feel free to republish on your site, with attribution and a link. Adaptation and rewriting, though allowed, should be true to the original.

 

Also Read

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Written By

MediaNama’s mission is to help build a digital ecosystem which is open, fair, global and competitive.

Views

News

Do we have an enabling system for the National Data Governance Framework Policy (NDGFP) aiming to create a repository of non-personal data?

News

A viewpoint on why the regulation of cryptocurrencies and crypto exchnages under 2019's E-Commerce Rules puts it in a 'grey area'

News

India's IT Rules mandate a GAC to address user 'grievances' , but is re-instatement of content removed by a platform a power it should...

News

There is a need for reconceptualizing personal, non-personal data and the concept of privacy itself for regulators to effectively protect data

News

Existing consumer protection regulations are not sufficient to cover the extent of protection that a crypto-investor would require.

You May Also Like

News

Google has released a Google Travel Trends Report which states that branded budget hotel search queries grew 179% year over year (YOY) in India, in...

Advert

135 job openings in over 60 companies are listed at our free Digital and Mobile Job Board: If you’re looking for a job, or...

News

Rajesh Kumar* doesn’t have many enemies in life. But, Uber, for which he drives a cab everyday, is starting to look like one, he...

News

By Aroon Deep and Aditya Chunduru You’re reading it here first: Twitter has complied with government requests to censor 52 tweets that mostly criticised...

MediaNama is the premier source of information and analysis on Technology Policy in India. More about MediaNama, and contact information, here.

© 2008-2021 Mixed Bag Media Pvt. Ltd. Developed By PixelVJ

Subscribe to our daily newsletter
Name:*
Your email address:*
*
Please enter all required fields Click to hide
Correct invalid entries Click to hide

© 2008-2021 Mixed Bag Media Pvt. Ltd. Developed By PixelVJ