TRAI

TRAI’s MySpeed app allows users to measure their Internet connection speed on WiFi or cellular network—just like Ookla’s Speedtest.net app— but has one key feature: it allows the user to forward test reports to TRAI. The app requires location services to be enabled to initiate a speed test; it measures network strength, upload and download speed, response time, etc., while listing all instances of a speed test result under a singular tab. This is useful information for the TRAI, to collect data on network performance, which will help it in finalizing regulations. The TRAI says that results are reported anonymously, and won’t amount to registering a complaint.

What doesn’t help is that the application is full of bugs and hangs. It’s worth noting that the spam complaint registration app which TRAI had launched last month was full of bugs too.

Review of the MySpeed app

The app is comes at a hefty 23MB install size, which is quite large for a speed test app. On the first try, MySpeed app failed to launch causing my Android phone to freeze for a moment. The interface has minimal buttons/controls with just 4 different tabs for test initiation, list of previous tests, current result summary, and settings tabs respectively. Note that the app prompts users to mandatorily enable location service on the phone, while it detects the kind of connection—WiF or Cellular—automatically.

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On second try, the app crashed again while the speed test was active, again freezing my phone. I had to then manually shutdown the app from task manager. On the third try, MySpeed app finally prompted me the test results with an option to forward test results to TRAI or initiate a retest. The app also allows users to check previous test results, with a Google Maps extension to denote the location of device during test.

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We aren’t the only ones who experienced bugs/crashes:

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Still no compensation for poor quality service: It is however not clear if the regulator will be taking steps to penalize telecom operators if individual user reports points out poor quality service. In the past TRAI  released Independent Drive Test results showing that telcos in many cities haven not met Quality of Service (QoS) standards and suggested telcos to compensate customer wit Re 1 per dropped call. However, this decision was struck down by the Supreme Court in May, leaving customers who pay for services with no compensations for poor quality service.

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