whatweread

The Ingenious Way Iranians Are Using Satellite TV to Beam in Banned Internet – Wired

YouTube is blocked in Iran. The TED site isn’t, but Iran’s trickling internet speeds make its videos virtually unwatchable anyway. So every couple of days, Reza plugs a USB drive into his satellite TV’s set-top box receiver and changes the channel to a certain unchanging green and white screen that shows only fixed text instructions.

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Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved – Joshua Topolsky on Medium

I can tell you from personal experience over the last several months, having met with countless investors and leaders of media companies and editors and writers and technologists in the media world that there is a desperate belief that The Problem can be solved with the New Thing.

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Film Dialogue

Lately, Hollywood has been taking so much shit for rampant sexism and racism. The prevailing theme: white men dominate movie roles.

But it’s all rhetoric and no data, which gets us nowhere in terms of having an informed discussion. How many movies are actually about men? What changes by genre, era, or box-office revenue? What circumstances generate more diversity?

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Three ways to spot if an image has been manipulated – Poynter

“There’s a temptation to want to have some magic bullet or magic algorithm that will tell you whether an image is real or not, and we quickly realized that’s just not going to work,” he said. “What you have to do is approach it as a detective and examine all the various clues in the image itself and the file that contains the image.”

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Wired’s making the long and slow switch to HTTPS and it wants to help other news sites do the same – NiemanLab

Switching a site over from HTTP to HTTPS can take hundreds of hours from start to finish, a job that most publishers aren’t willing, or don’t have the engineering resources, to pull off. Technically, the biggest part of making the switch is as simple as swapping every mention of http to https in a site’s code, but that process means auditing the entire codebase that makes up publishers’ sites. Even The Washington Post, which started last year, hasn’t completely finished the process yet.

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How Craig Wright Privately ‘Proved’ He Created Bitcoin – Wired

On the morning of April 7, Andresen took a red-eye to London and proceeded directly to a hotel in the Covent Garden district. He met Wright and two associates in a conference room there that afternoon and, Andresen says, Wright performed the cryptographic feat that erased his remaining doubts.

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Homo Sapiens 2.0? We need a species-wide conversation about the future of human genetic enhancement – TechCrunch

Mitochondrial Transfer is a first and in many ways relatively small step. But the use of heritable genetic alterations to reduce or eliminate genetic diseases will not and cannot end there. If we can eliminate mitochondrial disease with genetic transfer, won’t people with other genetic diseases want us to spare their future children?

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Flaws in Samsung’s ‘Smart’ Home Let Hackers Unlock Doors and Set Off Fire Alarms – Wired

Earlence Fernandes, one of the University of Michigan researchers said, “The worst case scenario is that an attacker can enter your home at any time he wants, completely nullifying the idea of a lock.”

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Want to Know What Facebook Really Thinks of Journalists? Here’s What Happened When It Hired Some. – Gizmodo

In interviews with Gizmodo, these former curators described grueling work conditions, humiliating treatment, and a secretive, imperious culture in which they were treated as disposable outsiders. After doing a tour in Facebook’s news trenches, almost all of them came to believe that they were there not to work, but to serve as training modules for Facebook’s algorithm.

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Ad Blockers Are Making Money Off Ads (And Tracking, Too) – Wired

On the other hand, Adblock Plus—possibly the most popular ad blocker on the Internet—is a business. For you, the web user, it’s a free browser extension that blocks ads, banners, pop-ups, and video ads. It also disables tracking services. But for many in the publishing and ad industries, it’s the scourge of the web. And it takes advantage of that antagonism.

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Apple Stole My Music. No, Seriously. – Vellum

What Amber explained was exactly what I’d feared: through the Apple Music subscription, which I had, Apple now deletes files from its users’ computers. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple’s database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted.

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One Swede Will Kill cash Forever – Unless His Foe Saves It From Extinction – Wired

I challenge anyone to come up with reasons to keep cash that outweigh the enormous benefits of getting rid of it. Imagine the worldwide suffering because of crime, from drug dealing to bicycle theft. Crime that requires cash. The Swedish krona is a small currency, used only in Sweden. This is the ideal place to start the biggest crime-preventing scheme ever. We could and should be the first cashless society in the world.—Björn Ulvaeus

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The Startup Zeitgeist – The Macro

The term “SaaS” (Software-as-a-Service, aka, people pay for it) has increased in usage by 400% since 2008, while “Advertising” has decreased by more than 60%. Startups related to blogging used to be very fashionable — many applications suggested tools for bloggers, better blogging sites, or search engines for blogs. This space is no longer popular.

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The music industry seems to love YouTube. Why do they keep saying they hate it? – Recode

I understand that developing new models in an entrenched industry sucks. Once you’ve built up infrastructure, you want to get value out of it before building something new. But that’s not what Irving Azoff and I are talking about, we’re talking about the rights and future of creators.

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Read previous articles from this series here.

Image source: Flickr user Robert under CC BY-NC 2.0