whatweread

AI & The Future Of Civilization – Edge

“How do we figure out goals for ourselves? How are goals defined? They tend to be defined for a given human by their own personal history, their cultural environment, the history of our civilization. Goals are something that are uniquely human. It’s something that almost doesn’t make any sense. We ask, what’s the goal of our machine? We might have given it a goal when we built the machine.”

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Slack, I’m Breaking Up With You – Medium

“Me with my exploding inbox, you with your (very sexy) ambition to make email obsolete. Only, I don’t know if we’re so good for each other, after all. Or, more to the point, I don’t know if firing up a relationship with you ever really fixed what was broken in my other one to begin with.”

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Lawrence Liang’s Speech at JNU Alternative Classroom (video)

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Why You Won’t Recognize Your Supermarket in 5 Years – Epicurious

“It’s going to be even more about community and the personal experience than it is now,” says Tre Musco, President and Chief Creative Officer of Tesser: Big Picture Branding, who investigated the future of grocery for the Food Marketing Institute. “Everyone’s talking about robot this and high-tech that, but it’s really about going in the other direction, more high-touch.”

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The Secret History Of Silicon Valley – Steve Blank (slideshow)

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“People will fall for it like a drug”—Game devs on the future of VR – Ars Technica

“The ability to create experiences unlike anything that’s possible in a traditional gaming on a 2D screen… ‘I was a little skeptical when I first put them on, but I have to say I was really blown away. I felt emotions that I think were impossible to reproduce without that medium—a real sense of fear, a real sense of wonder.’”

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What Whales Do at Night – Scientific American

“In waters off the West Antarctic Peninsula, Ari Friedlaender, an ecologist with Oregon State University’s Marine Mammal Institute, found that humpback whales fed exclusively at night when the krill migrated vertically into shallower water and became an easier catch. During the day, when krill were deeper and harder to access, the humpbacks spent more time resting at the surface.”

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Read previous articles from this series here.

Image source: Flickr user Robert under CC BY-NC 2.0