Video

In our #Outlook16 series, we spoke to digital video companies – Spuul, Sony LIV, Vuclip, YuppTV and MTV India about their focus areas for 2015, and the challenges that the online video ecosystem needs to address.

What were the top developments for the sector in 2015? How has the sector changed between 2014 and 2015?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

The way we see it, 2015 was when the video on demand (VOD) industry in India witnessed a shift in gears. We saw many media houses and studios going mobile. Mobile overtook traditional platforms such as TV to become the screen of choice for a majority of Indians. Due to the availability of sub-$100 Android devices, smartphone adoption played a significant role as has increased proliferation of data plans, in the way Indians are today consuming entertainment and information ‘on-the-go.’

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

We felt two developments were key this year:

While outside of India, cord-cutting is becoming the norm, in India streaming finally entered the national consciousness.

– Content was created & marketed specifically for the web
– Multiple players entered  the space, educating & growing the market.
– Apple opened the Apple TV to developers. Apple has been creating industries since the launch of the iPhone. It seems like the TV ecosystem, much like smartphones will be split into 2 camps – Apple & Google. Either way, developers & VOD services will benefit.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

India’s OTT video sector is nascent but the market for online video consumption has developed rapidly in 2015. The OTT video market is largely skewed in  favour of advertising. Current infrastructure favours AVOD over SVOD models as the market for SVOD remains fairly nascent. The industry has experienced exponential growth in non-linear digital infrastructure, anchored to rising smartphone penetration, increasing numbers of broadband users and faster internet speeds. All indicators suggest that the ecosystem will continue to improve at a rapid pace adding fuel to the gold rush in OTT video. Video will account for 66% of mobile data traffic in India by 2019, up from 36% in 2014, according to estimates from CISCO.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Ekalavya Bhattacharya

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

The top developments have definitely been related to how brands and marketers now look at Online Video. They know this is the future and a lot of them are learning to adopt and adapt. Ecommerce, FMCG, Automobile are major sectors where you’ll now see in-house content teams residing within companies.

Every marketer now has content as a KRA. The growth of branded content has been incredible this year. The fact that content strategy for brands is no longer limited to them running their 30-second TVC as a pre-roll is a delight to me. 

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

The market has accepted OTT as a mainstream technology in delivering TV. We have also seen a tremendous increase in the number of devices supporting OTT globally – streaming devices, smart TVs and smartphones and the same is reflected in the India market as well. Entire eco-systems – devices, CDNs and media houses have geared up for the paradigm shift.

What were the biggest challenges for the sector in 2015?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Network inconsistency that leads to videos being buffered while streaming is a universal problem for the video on demand (VOD) industry. Additionally, video streaming is data intensive and entails data costs. These were barriers to viewers consuming long form content and will continue to be if they aren’t dealt with in innovative ways.

With telecom carriers entering the OTT VOD fray in addition to production houses, music apps and DTH service providers, the market became increasingly cluttered in 2015. How each player differentiates and innovates will determine whether or not they succeed in sustaining viewer interest since consumers will not want to download and juggle between 10 different video apps.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

The challenges remain the same as the year before with some improvements though not the massive ones we were hoping for:

– High data costs & connectivity continue to be an issue. The much awaited Reliance Jio launch didn’t happen. We remain hopeful of a launch in 2016. 

– Piracy continues to be a scourge. Having said that, content owners have definitely become vigilant of piracy on streaming sites such as YouTube.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Quality of bandwidth and reliable digital payment options.

– Piracy: Indian OTT video providers generate significant traffic from the streaming of live TV channels. As a result, the piracy of sports rights, especially live streaming of matches, is a concern. While physical piracy (piracy of packaged media such as DVDs) has reduced in recent years, online piracy has proliferated. With the future growth of fixed broadband networks, piracy of content will increase, impacting subscription revenue potential for OTT providers. It is therefore crucial that legislation governing copyright infringement be developed soon.

– Broadband reach, speeds and adoption: Broadband penetration and adoption is inadequate in India. Despite the near ubiquity of cable networks, two-way network upgrades have been limited. Capital expenditure has been focused on network digitalization on account of a mandatory cable digitalization program, driven by the government. 

– ARPU cap for linear pay-TV services: Despite the high penetration of pay-TV services in India (more than 80% in 2014), ARPUs remain low at under US$4 a month. Subsequently, there exists an invisible ARPU ceiling on OTT services, with OTT SVOD monthly ARPUs averaging US$0.65 in 2014. The transition of OTT services – from providing live streaming of TV channels to VOD – will help significantly improve ARPU potential in the long-term, especially when incremental features, such as recommendation engines, are added.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Internet infrastructure in India has been the biggest challenge for the expansion of OTT. Broadband infrastructure is limited to only a few cities and wireless infrastructure is not consistent in 3G and 4G networks for a seamless video experience over the internet.

What are the trends that surprised you in 2015?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

The Global Video Insights (GVI) report that presented Q2 2015 survey results revealed that video quality and video content trump celebrity appeal as factors that inspire Indians to consume and share videos with their family and friends. The same survey revealed that nearly 44% of Indians still own feature phones and Symbian devices. This necessitates VOD players to offer their services via the mobile web enabled platforms in addition to apps – something which app-based VOD players have not tapped into.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Content created for the web, like TVF Pitchers took off, was surprising yet heartening – telling us that there was a market for good content created specifically for an online audience.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Uday Sodhi

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Pace of mobile video consumption – length of consumption on mobile devices. Long form gets consumed.

Video consumption continues to skyrocket where devices like mobiles, tablets and Connected TVs, set the agenda for the continuing growth of online video viewing, especially for long form content. Consumption of long-form online video content has taken a big leap and will continue to rise as viewers watch increasing amounts of online video content across devices. This is also in line with researches which show that more than 50% of online video views came from smartphones and tablets. 28% Indian users watch less traditional television compared to mobile. 40% of this consumption happens during ‘late at night in bed.’

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Cable and DTH providers have accepted OTT as a mainstream technology and launched their own OTT platforms. Major media houses have shifted their focus from content creation to content distribution by launching their own OTT services and limiting their content on other OTT platforms. This impedes the possibility of reaching more audience.

What were your key learnings in 2015?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

A diversified content catalogue coupled with an unparalleled viewing experience is what the mobile video viewer wants. In 2015, we found that a strong video library backed by content in regional languages plays a key role in catering to the diverse entertainment needs of our subscribers from Asia to Africa. 

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

We found that if we provided a good product with content that end users want, there were enough and more people willing to pay for it  to make VOD in India a sustainable &  profitable business.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Even though OTT as a technology is easy to deploy, the barriers of entry are very high and without quick growth, survival of the platform becomes difficult.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Consumer choices are moving towards on-demand. Increase in consumers watching streamed on-demand video. These changing habits are linked to the proliferation of smartphones, tablets and connected TV screens, where consumers can easily and conveniently access their on-demand content.

What consumption patterns did you observe in 2015? How has it changed since 2014?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Vuclip’s Q1 2015 Global Video Insights Survey revealed how consumption of vernacular content is taking center stage with 78% of viewers in India showing a preference to watch videos in their native languages. While Hindi videos constitute over 40% of viewership traffic in India, videos in languages such as Tamil (8%) Telugu (6%) Bengali (4%) and Marathi (4%) are also seeing increased traction.

Comedy continued to attract maximum viewers in 2015. Additionally, short form content in the form of movie scenes and music video clips got more eyeballs than TV shows on the Vuclip platform.

Overall, the engagement times, the amount of consumption on smartphones and the increased use of Wi-Fi have been patterns that accelerated tremendously in 2015 over 2014.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Mobile continues to dominate as the preferred platform to consume content on Spuul.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Video on the go. Millennials prefer the mobile screen. TV and video content is increasingly being accessed via smartphones. In fact, since 2012 there has been a 71% increase in the number of consumers who watch video on their smartphones. When taking tablets and laptops into consideration as well, almost two thirds of the time spent watching TV and video among teenagers is on a mobile device. However, watching video on mobile devices is not limited to the youth. In the US, 86% of smartphone users watch video content on their phones. The reach of TV and video content on smartphones has increased significantly over the past few years, and 2 out of 10 consumers regularly watch linear TV on their smartphones. All in all, the average time spent watching TV and video on mobile devices, including tablets and laptops, has increased by three hours a week over the past three years.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Mobile video consumption is going through the roof. As a country, India has moved from a 1 TV household to a multi-screen household because of smartphones. We have skipped the 2 TV household phenomenon.

Another consumption pattern which we observed is that digital  is no longer seen as a platform for only short-format videos. Additionally, brands are willing to invest a lot of money into branded content.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

2015 saw a rapid rise in the internet video consumption in India and especially in TV content available over the internet. Earlier mainly news channels attracted the majority of the audience, now GEC content is also being watched over the internet.

Which categories and sub-categories are likely to be the key drivers of growth in 2016? Why?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

The most popular content includes the latest regional movies, and international TV content such as sitcoms will likely continue to be big in 2016.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Drama and Comedy will drive consumption.

Live sporting events and movies have great potential and will be the key drivers of growth in 2016. 2014 was the most digital sports watching year ever recorded. With the Olympics, March Madness, World Cup, and every major sporting league adding digital video options, consumers embraced the shift to online. With the emergence of larger screens, smartphones will show more starts than tablets for these large sporting events. 

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Comedy, Sport and Bollywood will continue as drivers in India. When mainstream daily Hindi GEC drama shifts to OTT platforms, you will see explosive growth. In terms of monetization, kids content has great potential.

Also something we should keep in mind is that when you are talking OTT, you are no longer limited by the geo and physical limitations of distribution! So there is a massive Indian diaspora which sits outside India which can be tapped into.

How has your relationship with movie studios/content providers changed in 2015?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

We on-boarded new studios, as well as renewed agreements with existing ones. Our focus has been on regional and international studios to meet consumer needs in each of our key markets. For example, in December 2015, we signed a partnership deal with Sony Music Entertainment, which has exclusive music rights for the Shah Rukh Khan-Kajol starrer Dilwale.

In March 2015, we integrated the Verimatrix Video Content Authority System (VCAS™) into our platform to support a subscription-based model that would enable our content partners to maximize their revenue, thereby keeping their content premium.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

– As satellite deals become limited to only the top movies – digital has become a great alternative for production houses to recoup costs  & get eyeballs. This has also meant that content windows shortened considerably – it is not uncommon for a movie to be available on digital as soon as thee theatrical release is over.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Movie studios are opening  up to the digital monetisation opportunity.

What was your biggest source of traffic in 2015 (search, social or direct)? How do you expect this to change in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Social sharing and word of mouth are our biggest drivers.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Targeted advertising – specifically on mobile was our biggest driver.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Both direct and search have contributed equally to our traffic. In 2016, with more people becoming aware about YuppTV, we expect the direct traffic to increase.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Social has been our biggest source of traffic. This is also because we don’t have an app-only strategy. We are in the content business and are present everywhere a user might want to interact with MTV. If mobile-app traffic increases tremendously in 2016, then I see direct traffic going up.

Considering YouTube now has original programming as well as a vast library of videos, what steps should video platforms take to deal with the challenges faced from YouTube?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Nickhil Jakatdar

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

YouTube is the go-to destination in consumers’ minds for user generated content. Now we are increasingly seeing user generated content adoption on Facebook and Whatsapp. Premium brand conscious studios like their premium content to be on an OTT destination and not mixed with user generated content. Similarly we have found that the big advertisers want to advertise increasingly against licensed brand-safe content which can sometimes be a challenge when UGC and licensed content are combined.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

– YouTube is focussed on free ad-supported content. Spuul focuses on content, from studios that is typically not available on YouTube & resides behind a paywall.

– We will provide our paid users earlier access to the best content, before it goes free on YouTube. 

Uday Sodhi, SonyLIV

YouTube will continue to be a strong distribution platform and we view it as a partner to share and monetize content with rather than a threat. There is enough and more room in this ecosystem to share and grow at the same time.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Youtube will be a key part of everyone’s strategy. Be it for promotions, windowing, branded content, eventual subscription etc. The reach of Youtube is undeniable. What one needs to keep in mind though is platforms and media companies are not in the business of only entertaining audiences. We are all in the business of business and hence one will have to tackle Youtube based on their business strategy.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

YuppTV has launched Bazaar, a curated marketplace which gives better visibility to the content providers and easy access to the users. YuppTV has started investing in original content and would continue to do so in 2016.

What are some of the broad trends that you expect to see in the sector in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

The trend of social sharing of videos via instant messaging platforms such as Whatsapp and social networks such as Facebook will continue in 2016. This will lead to even more video consumption through the discovery route.

Brand managers will likely begin to see the potency of mobile video on demand (VOD) platforms as an end-to-end marketing channel that facilitates better targeting of prospective customers. Through micro, nano and hyper-targeting of a captive audience on a mobile platform, brands will be able to run their advertisements in a non-intrusive manner. 2016 is likely to witness mobile VOD players giving viewers the option of choosing which ads they want to watch as well as pave the way for interactive advertisements.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Ravi Bhushan

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

– With Chromecast & Apple TV gaining ground – we will see a lot more users connecting their TV to the internet.

– Consumption on mobile devices will continue to dominate. As is often the case, this also means piracy on mobile devices will increase.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Market demands significant customization for content offering and delivery

– More than a dozen video streaming services expected by end of 2016
– Onset of 4G services should improve consumer affordability
– Consumer adoption of digital payment
– Increased access to networks faster than 4 Mbps to support widespread SVOD services

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

The adoption rate of digital wallets is remarkable.

One can actually draw up business plans based on users paying Rs 2 – 5 per video. I know I might sound unrealistic and extremely optimistic, but I can see people paying for content. ARPUs will be low, but the trend is definitely going to set in soon. Most of this will be fueled by a convenient way of paying, which I’m guessing will be via digital wallets.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Increased broadband penetration in tier 2 and tier 3 cities and better speeds in Metro cities. Launch of 4G network across various circles in India would help deliver better video streaming experience. More original and regional content will be produced for especially for OTT sector.

How big a problem is discoverability of content for online video platforms? How do you expect this to change in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

To date, social media has been a huge driver of discoverability. We expect this to remain in 2016. But personalization will also be key.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

This continues to be a huge problem for online platforms. On our part, we place a lot of emphasis on curation – going forward machine learning will play a key role in personalizing the curation experience.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Improved personalization and recommendations will help discoverability.

The growing range of available TV and video services is giving consumers a plethora of options to choose between. The final decision depends on the location, the device at hand, the available services and the available content. Consumers are open to providing personal data in order to get a better service experience. 

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTVIndia

I think this is more of a mindset thing. We like discovering content which has been socially attested by people we know. We ran an experiment where we studied Youtube consumption patterns for a lot of people.

A huge number of people have 2 primary forms of video consumption – 1) Someone shares a video link and they will click on it and go see the video. If they like the video, they might want to see similar content in that session. 2) People specifically know which video they want to consume and they’ll go to the platform and search for it.

There is a certain behavior which is still nascent, which is – I don’t know what I want to watch, let me go to this video platform and consume whatever it throws at me. Now a lot of people are banking on this. If this behavior becomes massy, then your data engineers will start curating and suggesting videos for you which will drive discoverability.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Curated platforms like YuppTV Bazaar make content discoverability easier and we expect the audience to shift to such platforms from traditional video sharing platforms.

What trends did you observe in Indian language content in 2015? How has it changed since 2014? What are your expectations in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Movie and music content in South Indian languages – predominantly Tamil and Telugu are major drivers of regional content consumption. Content in Bengali and Marathi too are in demand. The reason for this is deeper broadband penetration into Tier II and Tier III towns of India wherein the propensity to consume vernacular video content is higher. For 2016, it is our objective to ‘localize’ our content offerings to increase the breadth and depth of our regional audience engagement.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Regional language is finally waking up to digital – expect Spuul to announce a number of regional language deals in the future.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Inspite of Internet in India being predominantly an English only medium, the viewership of regional mobile video content is rising in India. Although movies and television shows account for around 80 percent of the International content consumed, 78 percent of viewers in India have shown preference to watching content in their native language. Hindi videos constitute over 40 percent of viewership traffic in India. Videos in languages such as Tamil, Telugu, Bengali and Marathi are also seeing increased traction.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV

With MTV, we primarily have a Hindi strategy for on-air and on digital platforms it is a mix of Hindi, English and Hinglish. We experimented with dubbing Roadies in Tamil and Bengali for our digital audiences. Was it eye-opening and world-changing? No. Does it still have massive potential? Of course.

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

The quality of Indian content has increased tremendously. Regional content and local news have attracted a lot of viewership and we expect that regional content will take a much bigger piece of the pie in 2016.

What was the split for traffic for mobile and web in 2015? Additionally, what is the split for traffic for mobile app and mobile web during the year? How do you expect this to change in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

We are working towards being a multi-platform service. The traffic has been fairly balanced across our mobile web platform (http://m.vuclip.com) and the Vuclip app catering to entry level device and first time data plan users  and the more sophisticated smartphone and high data users respectively.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

– 60% mobile (WAP + app) and  40% desktop.

– We expect mobile to increase it’s share of the pie in 2016.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

65-70% traffic contributed by mobile. With increased penetration of smartphones growing at a tremendous pace, India is expected to have ~200 Mn smartphone users by 2016. With these consumption trends, it is imperative that mobile will drive majority of the traffic.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex- MTV India

Specifically with respect to MTV India, 65% of our traffic (our assets) came from mobile devices. For us traffic has been far higher for mobile web than app. Less than 20% of total mobile traffic was for our app. 

Udaynandan Reddy, Yupp TV

Mobile traffic has marginally overtaken web traffic in 2015 and we expect mobile traffic to grow much faster than web in 2016. We have also seen an increase in the mobile web traffic in 2015.

What trends did you observe in customer preference for downloaded and streamed videos in 2015? How do you expect this to change in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Downloading videos is a preference among viewers in emerging markets owing to patchy network connectivity, slow broadband speeds and the scarcity of free WiFi zones – which serve as hindrances to video streaming. 

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Providers of online video services are clearly impacting consumer behavior by making streaming much more readily available than downloads. This behavior is based on consumers’ preference for streaming over downloading, as well as customers’ desire for free/ad-supported content and subscription-based VoD. These all won out over transactional VoD (TVoD) content. Free and subscription VoD (SVoD) services also outshine TVoD. 65% of users prefer video streaming to downloading videos on their phones

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Let us look at music. Streaming has won the battle against downloading. I think even in videos, the eventual winner will be streaming. 

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

With average internet speeds going up in various regions, streaming video quality is on par with downloaded videos. This trend will continue and users will prefer streaming over downloading content.

What were the biggest challenges related to monetization? How do you plan to tackle them in 2016?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

The one challenge we anticipate with the entry of so many players in the VOD space is that if there is any form of illogical behavior by any of the players in order to hit vanity metrics for the short term, it could temporarily impact the monetization ability for the more long term minded players.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Mobile broadband networks, increase in number of players, granular pricing for content consumption are some of the challenges related to monetization. With improved network reach, speed and adoption in 2016 and competitive pricing to get users hooked on to the wide array of blockbuster movies.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India 

I wrote a piece on Medianama about the ROI of a Youtube video back in August 2013. Unfortunately this scenario hasn’t changed much. A lot of people are trying different business models and so are we.  When will a lot of people start paying? It’ll happen. Not in 2016, but it will happen over the next few years.

Udaynandan Reddy, Yupp TV

Since OTT market is still at a nascent stage in India, both advertising and subscription revenues are not very high. The average CPM values for advertising are very low in India compared to the rest of the world and we expect the CPM values to go up in 2016 and advertising can become a major revenue driver in the long run.

How big a problem is India’s poor internet speed for video platforms? What are you planning to do for making sure the videos on your platforms can be viewed on low bandwidth?

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

Video streaming is data intensive and is highly dependent on reliable network connectivity. In a country like India where one cannot, at times, distinguish between 2G and 3G network performance, the end user experience is often exasperating with the video playing in fits and starts, something that we have come to know as ‘buffering’.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

We were one of the first platforms to introduce download – much before YouTube did. We continue to innovate in this department.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

The reach and penetration of broadband networks is poor which should improve with expanded efforts and advent of 4G services providing increased access to networks faster than 4 Mbps to help support the widespread VOD servicesContinuous and strong focus on Multibitrate streaming to help viewers consume videos at any bandwidth without hampering the viewing experience.

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex- MTV India

I think citing India’s poor internet speed is a convenient excuse. There are enough people in urban centers with a decent connection. This number itself will be higher than the population of some developed countries. 65% of MTV’s video consumption in India comes from mobile devices. A show like Splitsvilla clocked 105+ million video views this year across digital platforms.

The question should be – How big a problem is that people are still not willing to pay for content in India?

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Udaynandan Reddy

Udaynandan Reddy, YuppTV

Internet infrastructure in India is the biggest challenge for the growth of OTT services. Poor internet speed doesn’t allow a seamless viewing experience. YuppTV has made all the content on its platform available in multiple bitrates, so that there is no buffering even at 2G speeds.

What are the challenges that need to be addressed in 2016? Please explain how can these be addressed.

Nickhil Jakatdar, Vuclip

As discussed above, network connectivity is the biggest hindrance to video viewing experience on mobile devices in India. While the economics of the mobile internet don’t work in favor of the consumer in terms of cost effectiveness, the telecom authority can lay greater emphasis on beefing up the telecom infrastructure so as to enhance network efficiency.

A subscription based revenue model requires an effective payments system integration. Cashless transactions (i.e. payment via netbanking, credit and debit cards, e-wallets) are still at a nascent stage in India and lack consumer confidence. Carrier billing can address this issue.

Ravi Bhushan, Spuul

Bandwidth and data costs will continue to be a challenge. Companies that can optimise for this, will have a better chance of winning in the space.

Uday Sodhi, Sony LIV

Driving revenues through subscription – competitive pricing.

Evolving payment mechanisms  – OTT mobile wallets expected to grow at a higher rate and would act as an enabler to the content monetisation

Even though data consumption is on the rise, the connection speeds are much lower than most other countries in the world. This is currently the biggest roadblock for the digital content industry in India. 

The easy availability of pirated digital content in India raise viability concerns for the subscription-based monetization model in the digital content market. However, ease of access, bundled services, and other product offerings will create a positive eco-system towards subscription-based services

Ekalavya Bhattacharya, ex-MTV India

Ad-Blocking! Let us be real about this. Most of us in the business know this is an issue but no one speaks about it openly. Additionally, the ‘Skip’ button on a pre-roll ad continues to be the most clicked button on the internet.

As we slowly evolve into the world of OTT, brands will need to evolve too. As content distribution and communication changes, what happens to brands? They will now have to maximize consumer touch points. 

Image sourceJoe The Goat Farmer under CC BY 2.0