Publishing house Oxford University Press (OUP) will be launching 3 digital platforms: Oxford Educate Premium, Oxford Achievers and My Maths for school going children, reports NDTV.

Oxford Educate integrates ebooks with interactive tools and learning material such as interactive animation, videos, poems, prose and audio for different courses, slideshows, lesson plans, answer keys, worksheets and image references among others.

The web based assessment program Oxford Achievers helps to measure the impact of the teaching and learning process. The device agnostic Achievers program will test basic skills, and assess the learning deficiency, after which it will suggest exercises for improvement. It will also be used by teachers and schools to assess their ratings among their peers. OUP claims that it used this program in Hong Kong previously and is customising it for India. It says that it has piloted the program in 10 schools. Similarly, OUP claims that its online and animated My Map product is being used in the UK, and will be customised for Indian curricula.

Interestingly, a Times of India report from February mentioned OUP as saying that schools who were subscribed to Oxford Educate, were using less than 10% of the content from the platform. At that time, Kolkata had 300 schools who were using OUP texts, Bangalore had 300, while Hyderabad had 280.

The NDTV report also mentioned that OUP’s Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (yes, it still exists!) and Oxford School Atlas had completed 100 years, with the Atlas printing its 34th edition recently.

Other developments in the education sector:

– In December last year, The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) launched an online self-review tool for schools affiliated to the board called Saransh. CBSE said that this tool would allow schools to identity areas of improvement in students, teachers & curriculum and take necessary measures to implement change.

– In November last year, YouTube launched an Indian school curriculum focused education channel called Edu India. This channel featured subject and class specific videos for Class 1 to 11. YouTube had created separate channels for Classes 1-12 and subject-specific playlists for each standard.

– In the same month, Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU) digitized its curriculum books and made them available online to students, initially planning to offer around 350 books online.

– In September last year, electronics company Samsung launched an online education store under its Media Solutions Centre division called the Smart Learning solution. This solution was exclusive to India at that time and would be launched to other countries after assessing its performance here. The app provided multimedia tutorials, simulations, practice tests, study related text, exercises etc. for CBSE students between the classes 1 and 12.

– Apple’s iBooks Textbooks and iTunes U Course Manager became available in India in January last year. iBooks Textbooks were available in 51 countries, while the iTunes U Course Manager in 70 countries. At that time, iBooks Textbooks were multi-touch textbooks with interactive content, including animations, 3D diagrams, photo galleries, tap-to-play videos. They also had around 25,000 educational titles from independent publishers and teachers, including educational content from Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Hodder Education, and covered the complete US High School curriculum and the UK’s GCSE core curriculum.

– In October 2012, Google had started an experiment called ‘Google Wallet for web content‘ to allow publishers and content creators sell individual web content pages to their visitors. Google partnered with Peachpit, Oxford University Press and Dorling Kindersley (DK) for this initiative. The Oxford University Press would be offering 80,000 articles on topics ranging from Globalization to Ethics in the Middle Ages, from its Oxford reference content for purchase.

Also read: Trends in the Online Education sector in 2014

Image Credit: Flickr user Richard Lee