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Haptik, an app which lets its users get customer service for queries and company transactions, has accused Akosha, an online consumer forum with similar services, of cloning their app. In a blog post, Haptik CEO Aakrit Vaish pointed that both apps appear to have an identical interface, and the text that Akosha allegedly initially used in its Android App page description appears to be the same as for Haptik. Vaish said that Akosha was a company that Haptik tried to partner with when it launched. Apart from this, he pointed towards a hackathon that Akosha had organized for building mobile apps, saying that the winning ideas of the hackathon were not similar to what Haptik was doing (but the app is). He added that some of Haptik’s leadership team was at the hackathon, and one of their advisors was on the hackathon’s judging panel.

Akosha’s founder and CEO Ankur Singla has responded by saying that for Haptik to say that Akosha has copied its app is “a leap of imagination and faith.” He also added that with Akosha handles over 320,000 queries a month across web and phone, and their progression to mobile was only natural. The post also includes some of the code they used, and a link to a GitHub repository for handling AngularJs and emoticons.

Our take: their worlds are colliding

The point to note here is that Haptik may have noticed similarities in the UI and “About Us” descriptions, but functionally, Akosha’s services differ from Haptik’s from a user’s point of view:

Haptik offers localised services like complaint resolution, finding ATMs, troubleshooting phones and laptops, making restaurant reservations, and web check ins for flights among other things. It also lets users raise complaints with companies like Airtel, Amazon, Apple, BigBasket, BookMyShow and Croma including others.

In comparison, Akosha escalates consumer complaints to the said company’s escalation team which it then follows up with to resolve the issues. The user is updated through phone, SMS and email and if the complaint is unresolved, Akosha aids in approaching the consumer forum by drafting the complaint with an affidavit. The user needs to sign those documents and submit them to start the process. On the face of it, it appears that Akosha has a bigger directory than Haptik currently, spread across different companies and industries.

Both the companies offer other consumer complaints resolution services which overlap, and while there’s a difference between what both companies do, their worlds are on collision course.

Image Credit: Flickr user Maik Meid