The National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI) launched the .Bharat domain name in Devanagari script. This will make the domain available in eight Indian languages including Hindi, Marathi, Boro, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Nepali and Sindhi-Devanagari.

The registrations for the domain names started on the 15th of August, just as the Department of Electronics and Information Technology (DeitY) had announced last month. The sunrise A period, a time when Indian registrants holding Indian trademarks can register, started on that day and will end on the 15th September. The sunrise B period, when overseas registrants holding Indian trademarks can register will commence on the 1st of September and last 15 days. The sunrise C period, where existing registrants holding the domain name .in can register will last from the 1st of October till the 31st of October. Only after the 18th of November will the registrations open up to anyone publicly. (Source)

Along with .bharat, the domain names .company.bharat, .vidya.bharat and .sarkar.bharat will also be available for registration in Devanagari script. The Ministry of Communications and Information Technology said it would soon be launching the domain in other regional languages including Tamil, Punjabi, Gujarati, Urdu, Bengali, and Telugu among others.

Digital India: DeitY had recently received a nod from the cabinet for its project ‘Digital India’ to be implemented in a phased manner. As a part of the project the government plans to run a publicly available, 20 and 40 hour module on digital literacy in regional languages. The project on a whole aims to bring connectivity and digital literacy to the citizens while ensuring that all government services are made available electronically. Finance minister Arun Jaitley had previously proposed the allocation of Rs 500 crore towards this project during the budget.

Other Indic language initiatives

-India’s National Translation Mission (NTM) started working on a Machine Translation System (MTS) that would instantly translate text in English to Indic languages, in November 2013. NTM claimed it would initially extend support for 22 Indic languages.

-In June 2013, DeitY had also created a repository of fonts for all 22 constitutionally recognized languages through Technology Development for Indian Languages (TDIL). These fonts are available as a CD that can be procured from TDIL or the entire suite can also be downloaded from the TDIL website.

-Indian government had launched a tourism information search engine called Sandhan in five Indian languages – Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Telugu and Tamil – in September 2012.

-Back in 2009, Centre for Development of Advance Computing (C-DAC) released software tools for six more Indic languages – Bengali, Konkani, Kashmiri, Manipuri, Santhali and Sindhi. It had earlier released tools and fonts for Tamil, Hindi, Telugu, Assamese, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Oriya, Punjabi, Urdu, Gujarati, Sanskrit, Bodo, Dogri, Maithali and Nepali.