kyazoonga

Update: It took KyaZoonga 15 hours to sell 3,500 tickets it had for Sachin’s last test match, the company revealed in a press release. The irony is that it received 19 million hits within its first hour of ticket sales going live. So if the site hadn’t gone down for so long the tickets would have sold out within seconds.

Earlier: KyaZoonga, the online sports and entertainment ticketing company, was selected as the official ticketing partner for the final test of batting legend Sachin Tendulkar by the Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA). However, the sudden influx of visitors to the website following the announcement has brought it down. The company insists that tickets are not sold out yet.

The company has not revealed how many tickets are on sale and how many people were on the site as yet. The prices of the tickets are Rs 500, Rs 1000 and Rs 2500. Only two tickets per person can be booked online. KyaZoonga faced a similar outage during the ICC World Cup too when 10 million users logged on to the site, and several others refreshed pages to get hold of the 1,000 limited tickets made available online.

According to KyaZoonga Twitter account, it is receiving five times the traffic experienced during Olympic ticket sales. The website wasn’t loading for a lot of users even before the sale started at 11am, but the company claimed that it was using waiting room technology and added that the inventory (tickets in this case) were not deployed. However as the sale went live in a few minutes it was down again because of the number of visitors who were trying to grab the tickets.

Speaking about the company’s failure to keep the site up during the 2012 World Cup ticket sale, Neetu Bhatia, Chairman and co-founder of KyaZoonga had said that supply and demand is lopsided for Cricket events. She had said that even if they had access to 30,000 tickets there would still be more people who’d not get them. Also, organizers impose restrictions such as four tickets per match per person, and not Kyazoonga, but since it was the face of the event it was willing to take the brickbats. She drew parallels with TicketMaster’s site crashing when ticket sales for the Olympics started, even at a low demand.