Is a photograph of a magazine article posted on twitpic or facebook a case of copyright violation? Is a newspaper or a blog free to use a users status update? Is a search engine allowing users to search pirated content violating copyright? Is a peer-to-peer software that allows user share files abetting copyright violation? Who owns your comments? What happens to music businesses if the life of copyright is extended beyond 60 days? Should authors compulsorily have to retain copyright? Can Media businesses hold consumers liable for breaking DRM?

You’re invited to join us at Google India, Gurgaon, this coming Thursday, for an important discussion on the nuances of the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2010, and hopefully, the answers to many of these questions:

Converge: Implications of India’s Copyright Bill 2010, a seminar discussing the implications of the Copyright (Amendment Bill) 2010, hosted by Google India.

Panels
1. Access to Knowledge and Copyright Law
Covers: disability provision, educational documents, libraries, fair usage/fair dealing
2. Copyright Law, freedom of expression, and the future of the digital economy
Covers: content users & DRM, user generated content, blogs, search engines, video sharing, intermediary liability and safe harbor
3. Authors, Content Owners, and Media Business Models
Covers: authors’ rights, term of copyright, version recordings (online and mobile), role of copyright societies

Date: 27th May 2010
Time: 3:30 PM
Venue: Google India Pvt Ltd, 9th Floor, Tower C Building No.8, DLF Cyber City, Gurgaon India – 122002

Note: We’ll be announcing speakers shortly.

The last date for citizens (consumers and businesses) to submit their views to the Indian government is 31st May 2010, and we’ve put together this discussion so that many of you who might be considering submitting your views are better informed about the implications of the Bill for you as individuals, or for your business.

This Bill affects copyright, the creation and distribution of content, DRM, rights of authors, bloggers, photographers, publishers, search engines. It impacts the personal and private usage of music and video content on the Internet, freedom of speech, defines “fair usage” limits, establishes version recordings that would impact online and mobile singing competitions, among other changes. It impacts media publications, music distribution services, content aggregators, and above all, content creators and everyday users

Download an annotated copy here (courtesy the Centre for Internet & Society)

Inputs from the seminar will also be shared later with MediaNama readers.