Bangladesh has blocked access to YouTube over access to a controversial audio clip that was published on the website. The clip is in Bangla, and can be accessed here. 

According to the note ascribed to the video, the recording is of a tense meeting between Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and the Bangladeshi Army, following a mutiny by the countrys border guards on the 25th and 26th of February. Hasina had brokered peace between the Army and the border force by offering the border force amnesty, which angered army officials.

Bangladesh Telecom Regulator has said that the ban is temporary — perhaps they are trying to get YouTube to remove the video. 

What If Indian Sting Operations Were Put Up On The Internet?

With mobile phones doubling up as cameras and audio recorders, is no meeting secret? We wonder how such a situation would have been dealt with by the Indian government. Freedom of speech aside, how does Google deal with issues critical to a nations security? Who decides under what circumstances a clip, which may not be offensive, is taken down? Aside of Google and YouTube, how prepared are other social networks – particularly the Indian ones, geared up for such situations? Also, do interntaional sites like Orkut, Facebook, MySpace and YouTube enjoy greater amnesty than Indian platforms?

We haven’t seen many “sting operations” in India over the past few months, but with Indian elections around the corner, and discussions over seat and power sharing probably taking place behind closed doors, I wouldn’t be surprised if plots to uncover wheeling-dealing are being hatched. The Ministry of Information & Broadcasting can probably step in, incase of television, but will the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) step in to block what they call “anti-national sites”, like they did three years ago?

Related: 

— Tehelka promoters ‘vindicated’ by official papers – Sans Serif