Twitter said it’s now using technology to flag tweets that violate its rules; it removes about 38% of abusive content using these tools, compared to none this time last year, when it was relying solely on user reports to take down abusive content. The company also said:

  • There were 16% fewer abuse reports after an interaction from an account the reporter doesn’t follow.
  • It suspended 100,000 accounts for creating new accounts after a suspension during January-March 2019 –– a 45% increase from the same time last year.
  • A new in-app appeal process sped up response times by 60%.
  • It suspended 3 times more abusive accounts within 24 hours of a report than at the same time last year.
  • It removed 2.5 times more private information with an easier reporting process.

‘Hide replies’ to come in June

Twitter also listed some of the steps it plans to take to increase safety on the platform. These include:

  • Giving users more control over their conversations by giving them an option to hide replies to their tweets. It said this would be launched in June as an experiment, which means it could be modified or ditched ay any time based on user feedback.
  • Making it easier for users to share specifics when reporting so it can take action faster, especially when it comes to protecting people’s physical safety.
  • Adding more notices within Twitter for clarity and context, such as if a tweet breaks the rules but remains on the service because the content is in the public interest.
  • Updating its rules in the next few weeks so they’re shorter, simpler and easier to understand.
  • Improving the technology that flags abusive content.

Daily follows limit slashed from 1,000 to 400

Last week, Twitter slashed the daily follows limit from 1,000 to 400, presumably to combat spam and bot accounts. Twitter’s head of site integrity Yoel Roth acknowledged that such a limit alone could not stop spam, bots, or other types of manipulation, but they would make such spammy accounts “less effective, slower, and more expensive to operate”.