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YouTube has added donations cards to the platform, which will let YouTube users donate to US non profit organisations, who will get 100% of the donation, the company announced yesterday. The video streaming company adds that donations are non refundable, that its parent company Google covers the processing fees and neither the nonprofits nor the video creators see the donor’s contact information.

The donation feature is restricted to American non profits, but can be accessed by donors in Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the UK and the US. YouTube added that it plans to expand this feature to other countries soon.

Users who have donated will get an email receipt from “Network for Good”, an American non profit donor adviser fund, which collects and distributes the donations in partnership with Google. Also, users who donate $250 or more get a written acknowledgement via email, and will be processed through the Google Payments account. More info on how to add donate cards on videos here.

Facebook’s donate button and crowdfunding: In August last year, Facebook introduced a donate button for non-profit organizations, which could be placed on the main Facebook page or integrated in ads that show up in the timelines of users. Interestingly, non-profits could also select which users to display the Donate Now button to. This feature was not available for video. In November, Facebook started testing ‘fundraisers’, a new tool for nonprofit organizations to raise money for specific projects.

Tweet to donate: In November 2014, AIM-listed mobile VAS provider IMImobile partnered with UK’s Post Office to launch a new ‘Tweet to Donate’ payment solution that would allow Post Office to process donations via Twitter for BBC’s Children in Need charity campaign.

Other developments at YouTube:

– In November, YouTube said that it would protect certain YouTube videos in the US against copyright infringement under the fair use policy by offering to defend them in court (and subsequently pay for legal fees).

– In the same month, it launched three new translation tools: adding translated titles and descriptions when uploading videos, getting the community to add subtitles and buy translations for videos and captions for content creators.

– In October, YouTube launched a new paid service called YouTube Red which would allow users to watch videos without ads, original content and listen to music. The service was introduced in the Unites States for $10 per month.

Image Credit: JM3 via CC BY SA 2.0