All the complaints and take-down notices filed with Twitter or against Twitter users for copyright violation, have been about live streaming of Cricket, and sent from lawyers based in India, representing Cricket boards. An analysis that MediaNama did of information available on ChillingEffects.org, a database to which Twitter recently began submitting its takedown notice information, revealed the following:

– All the notices received by Twitter were related to links to sites offering (allegedly) illegal live streaming of Cricket online
115 notices were received by Twitter between 20th September 2011 and 6th January 2012 from India – from Bangalore based lawyers representing the Board of Control for Cricket in India, Cricket South Africa and Cricket Australia.
– Complaints covered 174 status updates from 94 unique users.
– Maximum complaints were against tweets from @pakicricteam (11), @cricketlink (9), @Junaidlang (7), @crictimeDotCom (7), @MobileTv1 (6) and @pamatolaa (6).
– 61 complaints were filed by the Board of Control for Cricket in India, 39 by Cricket South Africa and 15 complaints by Cricket Australia.
– The complaints, as expected, coincided with various beginning with the Champions League T20 series, for which the BCCI filed 39 complaints. 24 notices were filed, related to live streaming of Australia’s Tour of South Africa, and 15 for , India vs England. Other tournaments for which complaints were filed included India’s tour of Australia, Sri Lanka’s tour of South Africa, Australia vs New Zealand and India vs West Indies
– Maximum notices were filed on the 24th of November (23) all of which were by Cricket South Africa, around Australia’s tour of South Africa. 17 notices were filed on the 28th of October, of which all but one were by the Board for Control of Cricket in India, for the India vs England series. Sri Lanka’s tour of South Africa led to 15 notices filed by Cricket South Africa on 16th December 2011.

A random sampling of status messages suggests that the tweets have been removed by Twitter.

Twitter recently made changes to its technology, which will give it the ability to censor content in specific countries, and ensure that its business remains in accordance with the laws of each country. There is no clear indication of any complaints related to defamation or abuse, as well as requests for user specific information, and we’re not sure if such information would be available with ChillingEffects.org.

Google releases a transparency report on a regular basis, indicating requests for censorship and user data from each government, but it doesn’t share information on requests for removal of content from private entities as a part of its transparency report. As per the last available report (for the time period January-June 2011), Google received 1739 requests for disclosure of user data from the Indian government and 68 requests for removal of 358 items of content. It complied with 70% of the requests for user data and 51% for requests for removal.